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Spring 2014 Workshops Sponsored by Academic Development and Assessment

www.ada.txstate.edu

 

To register for any of these workshops, please go to    http://signup.txstate.edu

 

Dr. Nathan Bond:    NathanBond@txstate.edu        Tina Jackson:    TJ04@txstate.edu    512-245-2112

 

 

Research Workshops for All Faculty

 

 

Faculty Learning Community for Beginning Quantitative Researchers

Are you a qualitative researcher who wants to expand your set of research skills?  Are you an assistant, associate or full professor who needs a refresher course on quantitative research?  Are you an adjunct professor who wants to get involved in research?  Do you want to network with other researchers across campus and receive support as you conduct quantitative research studies?  If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then you are invited to join this faculty learning community for researchers.  After learning about statistical significance testing, workshop attendees will learn about bivariate correlations, and the ways to write up the results of these tests for publication.  Since the information in the workshops is connected, attendees are asked to attend all three workshops.  Prerequisites: None

 

An Introduction to Quantitative Research: Statistical Significance Testing

Dr. Brian K. Miller, Associate Professor, Department of Management

Wednesday, February 5     3:00 – 5:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

Analyzing Data with Bivariate Correlations

Dr. Brian K. Miller, Associate Professor, Department of Management

Wednesday, March 5     3:00 – 5:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

In Part 1 of this three-part series of workshops, Dr. Miller and the participating professors examined statistical significance testing.  A video of that topic is available on the website for the Testing, Research-support, and Evaluation Center at http://www.txstate.edu/trec/iirda/resource/onlinetraining.html .  You are encouraged to view the video before attending the second workshop, but it is not required.

 

In Part 2 on March 5th, attention is directed to bivariate correlations (e.g. Pearson product moment, tetrachoric, point biserial, Spearman’s rho).  These different correlations are computed depending upon the measurement scale used to measure the variables (e.g. nominal, ordinal, interval, ratio).  This workshop focuses on the relationship between two variables whether measured categorically or continuously.

 

In Part 3 on April 3rd, professors will learn about experimental design.  This workshop will focus on basic experimental design up to and including the Soloman four-group design.  We will also discuss methods of implementing a manipulation check.  This workshop focuses on differences between two or more groups on one or more variables in the lab or the field.

 

Since the information in the workshops is connected, attendees are asked to attend all three workshops. However, professors who were unable to attend the first workshop are, of course,  invited to attend the second and third in this Faculty Learning Community on Quantitative Research. Prerequisites: None

 

Experimental Design

Dr. Brian K. Miller, Associate Professor, Department of Management

Wednesday, April 2     3:00 – 5:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

Dr. Miller and the participating professors examined statistical significance testing in Part 1 and bivariate correlations in Part 2 of this three-part series.  We will now turn our attention to experimental design in this third workshop.  Experiments provide a much stronger foundation for causal inference than do correlational designs.  Experiments are used in the lab and the field as well as in industry, the classroom, and academia.  This workshop focuses on the basics of experimental design and will cover post-test only, pre-test post-test control group designs, the Solomon four group design, and most variations in between these.  We will also focus on designing manipulation checks and some basic statistical analysis of experimental data including t-tests, ANOVA, and if time permits MANOVA.  
Prerequisites: None

 

 

 

Theory Construction and Model Building – Foundations

Dr. Larry Price, Professor, Institute for Interdisciplinary Research Design and Analysis (IIRDA)

Friday, February 21     1:00 – 3:00 pm     Alkek 119

 

This course provides a systematic approach to theory development and/or refinement and constructing innovative analytic models for non-experimental and experimental research designs.  An integrated approach to theory, measurement, model development and analysis is the focus of the course as compared to an over-emphasis on traditional null hypothesis statistical testing (NHST).  Statistical and mathematical modeling (which subsumes NHST) has developed into a powerful epistemological system, within which NHST plays an important though not expansive role.  In the workshop we transition from qualitative world of language into concepts then mathematical models.  Mathematical models force theoretical precision, their assumptions can be more easily studied, they promote data analysis, and they have more practical applications.  For example, in psychology and other behavioral sciences, methodologists, and applied researchers describe the world in part through mathematical models.

 

In this workshop, we focus on research problems/questions of individual faculty to develop and/or refine a theory.  Next, analytic (statistical & mathematical) models are then constructed that align with the goal(s) of one’s research.  This process begins by introducing and applying concepts, constructs, theory, and measurement using faculty-specific examples. 

 

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this course; however, ideally one should have had two graduate-level courses in quantitative methods (exposure to correlation and regression analysis is highly desirable) earlier in their career.  The workshop is applicable to research problems/questions in education, liberal and applied arts, psychology, geography, sociology, mathematics and the biological and physical sciences.

 

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Development and Assessment (ADA); the Testing, Research-Support, and Evaluation Center (TREC); and the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research Design and Analysis (IIRDA).

 

 

Introduction to Simple Linear Regression and Multiple Regression with SPSS

Dr. Phillip W. Vaughan, Institute for Interdisciplinary Research Design and Analysis (IIRDA)

Friday, March 21     1:00 – 3:00 pm     Alkek 119

 

The basic technique of linear regression can be enormously useful across a wide variety of research contexts and disciplines.  In many instances, regression analysis allows for comprehensive examination of the effects of multiple predictors on a single, continuous outcome variable, including mediation and moderation effects.  This seminar will cover basic aspects of conducting and interpreting simple (one predictor) and multiple (two or more predictors) regression analyses using SPSS software.  Continuous and categorical predictor variables will be covered, and basic approaches to mediation and moderation will be discussed.

 

This seminar is particularly useful for faculty and graduate students familiar with introductory statistical techniques (e.g., the Pearson correlation coefficient, t-tests) who need to be able to statistically address situations where more than one predictor variable is involved.

 

Prerequisites: Basic computer literacy, exposure to introductory statistics (distributions, measures of central tendency, dispersion, correlation, hypothesis testing).

 

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Development and Assessment (ADA); the Testing, Research-Support, and Evaluation Center (TREC); and the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research Design and Analysis (IIRDA).

 

 

Building Surveys in Snap 11:  Web-Based Survey Software

Dr. Gail Ryser, Director, Testing, Research-Support, and Evaluation Center (TREC)

Yaowen Han, Coordinator Snap, Testing, Research-Support, and Evaluation Center (TREC)

Friday, March 28     9:00 am – 12 noon     Alkek 118

 

TREC coordinates the use of Snap Surveys for faculty who would like to use it for a research project.  Snap can be used to create and manage web-based surveys.  It allows the developer to incorporate the security, access, and permissions needed to meet the Institutional Review Board (IRB) guidelines.  Snap is a PC-based software and users must be connected to the Texas State network to build a survey (respondents can use any computer and browser).  Users must have administrative rights to the PC on which they are building their Snap survey.  This training seminar will teach you to build web-based surveys using Snap and will provide hands-on training in the following areas:

 

·      Designing several types of survey questions in Snap 11

·      Building special features in your web-based survey including the use of routing

·      Setting up access to the survey for general use and with a custom login link

 

We highly recommend that you do not take this seminar until you are ready to build your survey.  Snap is powerful, but it has a steep learning curve.

 

Prerequisites: Basic computer skills, preferably PC

 

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Development and Assessment (ADA); the Testing, Research-Support, and Evaluation Center (TREC); and the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research Design and Analysis (IIRDA).

 

 

Teaching Workshop for Faculty New to the Profession

 

Teaching at a University: A Hands-on Workshop for New Faculty

Dr. Nathan Bond, Assistant Director, Academic Development and Assessment

Tuesday, January 7     9:00 am – 3:30 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

Faculty who are new to the teaching profession or new to Texas State University are invited to participate in this informative and interactive workshop.  The goal is to give participants practical advice for teaching at the university level.  The workshop will focus on four topics: (1) developing a relevant curriculum for your course, (2) delivering engaging instruction, (3) administering assessments that measure student learning, and (4) creating an effective learning environment.  Lunch will be provided.  This workshop will be repeated before each spring and fall semester.

 

 

Teaching Workshop Just for Adjunct Faculty

 

Faculty Learning Community for Adjunct Faculty

The Faculty Learning Community for Adjunct Faculty was a success this past fall semester!  The group agreed to continue in the spring and voted on the topics to study.  The topics are assessment, creativity, and cooperative learning.  All adjunct faculty are welcome to join this next FLC.

 

Are you a part-time faculty member who teaches a few courses at the university?  Do you want to network with colleagues across campus and cultivate stronger professional relationships?  If you answered “yes” to these questions, then you are invited to join the faculty learning community (FLC) specifically for adjunct professors.  By definition, a FLC is a cross-disciplinary group of faculty who engage in an active, collaborative, yearlong program to enhance teaching and learning and to build a supportive professional community.  Participants are asked to commit to all three meetings on February 19, March 19, and Apri1 16.  This semester’s participants will select the dates and topics for next semester’s FLC.

 

Designing Effective Assessments and Fair Grading Procedures

Mrs. Laura Ellis-Lai, Lecturer, Department of English

Mr. Mike Dickinson, Lecturer, Honors College & Instructional Design Support

Dr. Nathan Bond, Academic Development and Assessment

Wednesday, February 19     3:00 – 5:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

Creative Teaching Activities for Use in YOUR Class

Mrs. Jessica Dupree, Lecturer, Department of Health and Human Performance

Ms. Allie Thomas, Lecturer, Department of Health and Human Performance

Wednesday, March 19     3:00 – 5:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

During this session, faculty will learn a variety of experiential learning activities that can be modified to meet the curricular needs of their classes.  This will be accomplished through initiatives, communication tasks for large and small groups, and hands-on activities.  Faculty will increase student engagement in class through incorporation of these tools.

 

Cooperative Learning at the College Level

Mrs. Laura Duhon, Lecturer, Curriculum & Instruction

Wednesday, April 16    3:00 – 5:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

 

Teaching Workshops for All Faculty

 

Faculty Toolkit: Linking to Articles, eBooks and More

Lisa Ancelet, Administrative Librarian, Alkek Library

Thursday, January 9     10:30 am – 12 noon     Alkek 101

Friday, April 4             11:00 am – 12:30 pm   Alkek 101

 

The library has access to thousands of online articles, eBooks, dissertations, and more, and faculty need to link to it. This workshop covers the basics of linking to eJournal articles and eBooks in TRACS or syllabi, and will provide you with the tools you need to successfully link to them for remote (off-campus) access.

 

This workshop is sponsored by Alkek Library.

 

 

Using the Honor Code to Support Academic Integrity in the Classroom

Dr. David Wiley, Professor, Department of Health and Human Performances

Wednesday, January 29     1:00 – 2:30 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

This workshop will highlight the issues related to academic misconduct on campus and the ways the Honor Code can support academic integrity efforts.  Included in this presentation are “common” academic misconduct issues on campus, advice for avoiding these issues in the classroom, and the process to follow when faced with academic misconduct with students.

 

 

Promotion to Full Professor: Advice for Associate Professors

Dr. Gene Bourgeois, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Dr. Cynthia Opheim, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs

Thursday, February 6     1:00 – 3:00 pm      Alkek 105/106

 

Associate professors who are seeking the rank of professor are invited to this interactive and informative session.  Attendees will learn the expectations for achieving the next rank.  The university’s expectations for scholarship, teaching, and service will be discussed.

 

 

Using Social Media in the College Classroom

Ms. Jennifer Krou, Lecturer, Department of CIS and Quantitative Methods

Tuesday, February 11                        1:00 – 2:30 pm      Alkek 119

 

Social media is a natural and integral part of a college student’s life.  It provides instant access to information and facilitates easy communication with family and friends around the globe.  The use of social media outside the classroom is readily accepted; however, its pedagogical use by educators inside the classroom is still unknown.  This workshop will show attendees simple and practical ways that one professor capitalized on the strengths of social media and integrated it seamlessly into instruction.  Examples will include Facebook, Twitter, Vine, Instagram, Pinterest, Tellagami, Voki, and others.

 

This workshop is co-sponsored by Academic Development and Assessment (ADA) and Educational Technology Center (ETC).

 

 

What a Faculty Member at Texas State should know about the Texas Research Incentive Program (TRIP)

Dr. Michael Blanda, Assistant Vice President, Research and Federal Relations

Dr. Barbara Breier, Vice President, University Advancement
Wednesday, February 12     1:00 – 3:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

This workshop will present an overview of the Texas Research Incentive Program (TRIP), which is administered by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) and provides matching funds for philanthropic gifts that specifically support the research mission of the university.  Discussion topics will include gift eligibility criteria, the institutional process for submitting match request, the THECB review and award procedures, and Texas State’s policy for distributing the matching funds.

 

 

Teaching Latino Students at the University Level: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

Dr. Mary Esther Huerta, Associate Professor, Department of Curriculum & Instruction

Friday, February 14     10:30 am – 12 noon     Alkek 105/106

 

Texas State University is now a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI).  What implications does this have for professors as they teach their courses and mentor their students?  This interactive session will engage faculty to explore issues of culture, language, identity, and equity as factors that influence the schooling of Latino students at the K-12 and university levels.  These facets critically inform these students’ pathways to learning in higher education.

 

 

Dual Benefits of Mentoring College Students
(CANCELLED)

Dr. Marian Houser, Associate Professor, College of Fine Arts and Communication Studies

Dr. Rodney Rohde , Chair & Professor, Program in Clinical Laboratory Science

Dr. Anne Ngu, Professor, Department of Computer Science

Tuesday, February 18    1:00 – 3:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

**  Dr. Houser received the 2013 Muir Mentoring Award at Texas State University.

 

Recent research describes mentoring as the heart of graduate and undergraduate education.  It not only improves student performance but also enhances perceptions of the academic climate.  Is there anything in it for faculty?  The goal of this workshop is to present examples of how student mentoring has helped shape our careers at Texas State University.  In a group discussion format we will cover mentoring in the classroom, in research and writing, and in navigating the academic environment.

 

 

Fostering Teamwork among College Students

Dr. Nancy Wilson, Assistant Professor, Department of English

Dr. Eric Leake, Assistant Professor, Department of English

Wednesday, February 19     12:30 – 2:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

How might teamwork invigorate class, teach students collaborative skills, and help them assume responsibility for their own learning?  In this workshop, attendees will learn strategies to incorporate teamwork in class assignments and activities.  The Texas High Education Coordinating Board has identified teamwork as a core objective in which students consider different points of view and work together toward a shared goal.  Topics covered in this workshop include the development of teamwork assignments, applications to real-world problems, sensitivity to cultural diversity, and ways of assessing teamwork.

 

 

Instructor Responsibilities for Academic Accommodations in the Classroom

Dr. Stephen Ciullo, Assistant Professor, Department of Curriculum & Instruction

Mr. Clint-Michael Reneau, Director of the Office of Disability Services

Thursday, February 20     2:00 – 3:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

Have you ever wondered how you can better serve students with special needs and accommodations in your class?  Do you have experience teaching college students with learning disabilities?  This presentation will help you to identify the various forms of physical and learning disabilities of students at Texas State University.  You will be able to understand student learning accommodations and how you can provide appropriate support in the classroom.  Participants will discuss federal laws addressing students with disabilities’ rights and ways to accommodate and support these students in an inclusive university classroom environment.  Finally, the ways in which you can contribute to student’s academic success through reasonable accommodations and universal design will be discussed.

 

 

Faculty Toolkit: Scholarly Impact Beyond Traditional Measures

Ms. Margaret Vaverek, Faculty Outreach Librarian, Alkek Library

Wednesday, February 26     2:00 – 3:30 pm     Alkek 101

 

Interested in finding out the impact of your research in academia?  Frustrated by traditional tools that do not cover your discipline?  This workshop will discuss the pros and cons of the impact factor, introduce you to some of the newer tools for measuring impact, and provide some tips and tricks you can use to create and manage your scholarly profile in the rapidly evolving global research environment.

 

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Development (ADA) and Alkek Library.

 

 

Alkek Instant Theater Presents:  “Our Texas State World” – Celebrating the History of Texas State

Ms. Margaret Vaverek, Faculty Outreach Librarian, Alkek Library

Monday, March 3     11:00 am – 11:30 am     Instant-Theater (2nd floor Alkek Library)

 

March 3rd, 2014 marks the 115th anniversary of this fine institution where we all live, work, and learn.

The presentation will take about 30 minutes and will be a condensed history of the institution from founding to the present day, including great pictures and stories to showcase some of the places/people/and events that have shaped our history.

 

How did we get from being a Normal School to where we are today?

 

Come explore “Our Texas State World” and find out!

 

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Development (ADA) and Alkek Library.

 

 

Faculty Toolkit: Linking to Articles, eBooks and More

Lisa Ancelet, Administrative Librarian, Alkek Library

Wednesday, March 19     1:30 pm – 3:00 pm     Alkek 101

 

The library has access to thousands of online articles, eBooks, dissertations, and more, and faculty need to link to it. This workshop covers the basics of linking to eJournal articles and eBooks in TRACS or syllabi, and will provide you with the tools you need to successfully link to them for remote (off-campus) access.

 

This workshop is sponsored by Alkek Library.

 

 

Introducing iCAT: Connecting Student Activity and Achievement

Members of the iCAT Team

Thursday, March 20     10:30 am – 12 noon     JCK 460

 

Representatives from Student Affairs will provide training to faculty advisors on setting up the iCAT system so that students can receive credit on their transcripts for participating in student organizations.  Attendees will learn how to set up the system, what should be included, who to contact, and why iCAT is important.

 

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Development (ADA) and the Office of Professional Development.

 

 

Unintentional Mentors: Teaching and Reaching African-American Students

Tennille Lasker-Scott, Doctoral Candidate, University of Georgia

Tuesday, March 25     1:00 – 2:30 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

This workshop will focus on ways that university faculty can effectively reach and teach African-American students and other culturally diverse students by utilizing effective teaching methods and discussing the “unspoken truths” of mentoring and instruction.  The workshop will reinforce professors’ knowledge of the critical role they play in the development and retention of African Americans and other culturally diverse students.

 

 

Texas State e-Text Prototypes

Dr. Milt Nielsen, Associate Vice President, Instructional Technologies Support

Dr. Libby Allison, Professor, Department of English

Tuesday, April 1     1:00 – 2:30 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

Texas State has been evaluating e-textbook systems using third party vendors.  The goal has been around reduced student cost and potential for increased learning through tools provided by the vendor.  Through the lens of technology integration, we will look at the system, compare to publisher developed systems, and will discuss contrasting distribution methodologies.  We will also evaluate the impact on instruction and learning practices.

 

 

Fulbright: An Overview of the Process
Steve Wilson, Professor, Department of English

**  Professor Wilson serves as the Fulbright Representative at Texas State University.
Tuesday, April 8     3:30 – 5:00 pm     Alkek 105/106

 

Three-time Fulbrighter Steve Wilson will discuss highlights of the Fulbright program from a faculty perspective.  Workshop attendees will learn about the various types of Fulbright appointments, the elements that comprise a Fulbright call for proposals, and the requirements of a Fulbright application.  Professor Wilson will be joined by one of Texas State’s recent Fulbrighters as they share the personal and professional benefits of a Fulbright appointment.  In addition, the workshop will offer overviews of the Fulbright programs and opportunities, timelines, compensation, the review process, and reading the program call for proposals.

 

 

Faculty Toolkit: Gartner Research Training

Mrs. Liane Taylor, Librarian, Alkek Library

Tuesday, April 15     11:00 am – 12:30 pm     Alkek 101

Tuesday, April 15     12:30 pm – 2:00 pm     Alkek 101

Wednesday, April 16     11:00 am – 12:30 pm     Alkek 101

Wednesday, April 16     12:30 pm – 2:00 pm     Alkek 101

 

Gartner, Inc. is one of the world’s leading information technology research and advisory companies, and the university community has access to its large database of original research reports, case studies, and best practices. A Gartner representative will be on site on April 15-16 to lead hands-on workshops to explore all of the content within Gartner’s database, enabling you to incorporate Gartner’s research, best practices, real-world examples, and case studies into course assignments and group projects, as well as track emerging trends in technology and industry for your own research.

Faculty and students within business, CIS, computing, engineering, healthcare information management, and other technology-related fields will find a wealth of information within the Gartner database. Examples of what you can find within Gartner include:

·         Forecasts and market analyses for areas such as mobile communications, semiconductor manufacturing, and hardware security solutions

·         In-depth information on technology within industries such as banking and investment services, healthcare, and manufacturing

·         Research reports on areas such as outsourcing, customer relationship management systems, and business intelligence systems

Faculty should register for and attend one of the four sessions.

 

 

Faculty Toolkit: Author’s Rights & Publishing Agreements

Ms. Margaret Vaverek, Faculty Outreach Librarian, Alkek Library

Thursday, April 24     10:30 am – 12:00 pm     Alkek 101

 

An individual has legal rights associated with the scholarly/creative works they produce. As an author, you are usually the copyright holder to your work from the moment that work takes on a fixed form. Your rights are retained unless/until you to transfer those copyrights to someone else via a formal agreement.

 

Traditional publishing contracts often assign copyright to the publisher, thus limiting how and where the work can be used and distributed in the future. If this happens, authors may be restricted from incorporating this work into their teaching and research, posting it to a website, or in an Institutional repository or digital collection.

 

The purpose of this workshop is to provide information about author's rights and to provide additional resources for further information. Attendees will also learn about Texas State’s institutional repository, Digital Collections, and show examples of how including your published work in the open access repository can increase access to your research.

 

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Office of Academic Development (ADA) and Alkek Library.